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dc.contributor.authorMoquet, J.S.
dc.contributor.authorGuyot, J.L.
dc.contributor.authorMorera, S.
dc.contributor.authorCrave, A.
dc.contributor.authorRau, P.
dc.contributor.authorVauchel, P.
dc.contributor.authorLagane, C.
dc.contributor.authorSondag, F.
dc.contributor.authorLavado-Casimiro, W.
dc.contributor.authorPombosa, R.
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, J.-M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-20T00:42:45Z
dc.date.available2019-07-20T00:42:45Z
dc.date.issued2018-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://repositorio.senamhi.gob.pe/handle/20.500.12542/45
dc.description.abstractIn Ecuador and Peru, geochemical information from Pacific coastal rivers is limited and scarce. Here, we present an unedited database of major element concentrations from five HYBAM observatory stations monitored monthly between 4 and 10 years, and the discrete sampling of 23 Andean rivers distributed along the climate gradient of the Ecuadorian and Peruvian Pacific coasts. Concentration (C) vs. discharge (Q) relationships of the five monitored basins exhibit a clear dilution behavior for evaporites and/or pyrite solutes, while the solute concentrations delivered by other endmembers are less variable. Spatially, the annual specific fluxes for total dissolved solids (TDS), Ca2+, HCO3 −, K+, Mg2+, and SiO2 are controlled on the first order by runoff variability, while Cl−, Na+ and SO4 2− are controlled by the occurrence of evaporites and/or pyrite. The entire Pacific basin in Ecuador and Peru exported 30 Mt TDS·yr−1, according to a specific flux of ∼70 t·km−2·yr−1. This show that, even under low rainfall conditions, this orogenic context is more active, in terms of solute production, than the global average.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Masson SASen_US
dc.relation.ispartofurn:issn:1631-0713
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_PE
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/*
dc.sourceServicio Nacional de Meteorología e Hidrología del Perúes_PE
dc.sourceRepositorio Institucional - SENAMHIes_PE
dc.subjectAndesen_US
dc.subjectClimate controlen_US
dc.subjectPacific Riversen_US
dc.subjectRiverine dissolved budgeten_US
dc.subjectAndesen_US
dc.subjectEcuadoren_US
dc.subjectPacific Coast [South America]en_US
dc.subjectPeruen_US
dc.titleTemporal variability and annual budget of inorganic dissolved matter in Andean Pacific Rivers located along a climate gradient from northern Ecuador to southern Peruen_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen_US
dc.identifier.isni0000 0001 0746 0446
dc.description.peerreviewPor pares
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/ 10.1016/j.crte.2017.11.002
dc.source.volume350es_PE
dc.source.initialpage76es_PE
dc.source.endpage87es_PE
dc.source.journalComptes Rendus - Geoscience
dc.description.fundingWe thank the two anonymous reviewers for their constructive recommendations under the review process. This work was funded by the French “Institut de recherche pour le développement” (IRD), the French “Institut des sciences de l’univers” (INSU), and the “Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées” (OMP) through the HYBAM Observatory (Hydrogeodynamics of the Amazon basin). We especially thank Pascal Fraizy, Philippe Vauchel, Elisa Armijos, William Santini, Nore Arevalo, the SENAMHI (“Servicio Nacional de Meteorología e Hidrología”, Lima, Peru), the INAMHI (“Instituto Nacional de Meteorología e Hidrología”, Quito, Ecuador), the UNALM (“Universidad Nacional Agraria de La Molina”, Lima, Peru), as well as all members of the Observatory for Environmental Research HYBAM, for providing hydrological, suspended solids, and water chemistry data.es_PE


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